Thursday, November 10, 2016

Self-learning trial to use Spinnaker software


I am excited to announce Spiral have joined the team working on the first response adaptive platform trial to be based in Australia and New Zealand(REMAP-CAP).  The self-learning design for this clinical trial is an exciting new methodology that significantly reduces the time and number of patients needed to test treatments while increasing safety for trial participants.

For this project our Spinnaker software will be used in Australian and New Zealand ICUs to test questions related to community acquired pneumonia.  Spinnakers adaptability is a key factor in this self-learning/adaptive trial.

Trial funding
The trial is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand(HRC) and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia(NHMRC).

General Characteristics of a Platform Trial
  • A novel and innovative trial design that is highly adaptive and utilises frequent Bayesian interim analyses to answer as many questions as possible from the available sample
  • Simultaneously evaluates the effectiveness of multiple alternative treatment options in a heterogeneous population including identifying any interactions between treatments
  • Evaluates treatment effects in sub-groups
  • Allows modification of key trial parameters in response to accumulated information and predefined rules
  • Preferentially randomises participants to treatments that are likely to be more effective, leading to better outcomes for patients within the trial. 



Self-learning trial to use Spinnaker software


I am excited to announce Spiral have joined the team working on the first response adaptive platform trial to be based in Australia and New Zealand(REMAP-CAP).  The self-learning design for this clinical trial is an exciting new methodology that significantly reduces the time and number of patients needed to test treatments while increasing safety for trial participants.

For this project our Spinnaker software will be used in Australian and New Zealand ICUs to test questions related to community acquired pneumonia.  Looks like Spiral really does have the most adaptable clinical trial software in ANZ!

Trial funding
The trial is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand(HRC) and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia(NHMRC).

General Characteristics of a Platform Trial
  • A novel and innovative trial design that is highly adaptive and utilises frequent Bayesian interim analyses to answer as many questions as possible from the available sample
  • Simultaneously evaluates the effectiveness of multiple alternative treatment options in a heterogeneous population including identifying any interactions between treatments
  • Evaluates treatment effects in sub-groups
  • Allows modification of key trial parameters in response to accumulated information and predefined rules
  • Preferentially randomises participants to treatments that are likely to be more effective, leading to better outcomes for patients within the trial. 


Self-learning trial to use Spinnaker software


I am excited to announce Spiral have joined the team working on the first response adaptive platform trial to be based in Australia and New Zealand(REMAP-CAP).  The self-learning design for this clinical trial is an exciting new methodology that significantly reduces the time and number of patients needed to test treatments while increasing safety for trial participants.

For this project our Spinnaker software will be used in Australian and New Zealand ICUs to test questions related to community acquired pneumonia.  Looks like Spiral really does have the most adaptable clinical trial software in ANZ! 
Trial funding
The trial is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand(HRC) and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia(NHMRC).

General Characteristics of a Platform Trial
  • A novel and innovative trial design that is highly adaptive and utilises frequent Bayesian interim analyses to answer as many questions as possible from the available sample
  • Simultaneously evaluates the effectiveness of multiple alternative treatment options in a heterogeneous population including identifying any interactions between treatments
  • Evaluates treatment effects in sub-groups
  • Allows modification of key trial parameters in response to accumulated information and predefined rules
  • Preferentially randomises participants to treatments that are likely to be more effective, leading to better outcomes for patients within the trial. 


Wednesday, November 02, 2016

3 local ICU researchers receive 2017 HRC awards

The 2017 New Zealand Health Research Council general career development awards were announced on Monday and 3 of our favourite researchers received awards.

Shay McGuinness, Auckland District Health Board, received a Clinical Practitioner Research Fellowship for Improving outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery.

Paul Young, Capital & Coast District Health Board, received a Clinical Practitioner Research Fellowship for Prevention and treatment of fever in the intensive care unit.

Diane Mackle, Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, received a Clinical Research Training Fellowship for Knowledge translation in the management of oxygen therapy in intensive care.

Nga mihi nui

Read the HRC press release

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Paracetamol wins Wellington researchers $20,000 prize

Congratulations to Dr Paul Young for winning the Medicines New Zealand’s 2016 Value of Medicines Award for his work on the HEAT Trial.

Read more about the HEAT Trial and how we support researchers with our study management software

Media release as follows............
Monday, 10 October 2016, 9:48 am
Press Release: Medicines New Zealand
Paracetamol wins Wellington researchers $20,000 prize

Dr Paul Young will be presented with Medicines New Zealand’s 2016 Value of Medicines Award for leading a world-class study into the effects paracetamol has on patients in intensive care units (ICU) this evening.

“We are impressed with the range and high standard of entries for this year’s Award. The Value of Medicines Award supports innovative research that improves the understanding, effectiveness or safety of the use of medicines, and Dr Young’s research is a worthy winner” said Hon Heather Roy, Medicines New Zealand Chair.

Paracetamol, the world’s most commonly administered medicine, has never been tested on critically ill patients, until now.

Dr Young, a leading member of the New Zealand ICU research community, and his team at the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, collaborated with over 200 ICU doctors and 3000 ICU nurses to answer a simple clinical question that is faced each day with the patient: should the fever be treated with paracetamol or not?

“Dr Young’s study will have a considerable impact on clinical practice in a contentious area of research” said Mrs Roy.

The Value of Medicines Award will help Dr Young collaborate with researchers from Scandinavia and Australia in the area of fever management in the ICU.

The results from this study have shown:

· Paracetamol was safe and well tolerated in ICU patients with fever or infection
· The medicine reduced body temperature by around a quarter of a degree
· Patients who survived spent less time in ICU if they were given paracetamol, but patients who died spent more time in ICU before death if given paracetamol.

Dr Paul Young will be presented the 2016 Value of Medicines Award by Simon O’Connor, Member of Parliament for Tamaki and Chair of Parliament’s Health Select Committee, this evening.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Spinnaker Tip #4 - Save time with "Quick Entry" on changes

Spinnaker tracks changes that people make to your database. At the most basic level we track who made the change, what day/time they made it, and the before and after snapshots of each data point changed.

We know this can be a pain and we are here to help not hinder. So look out for the "Quick Entry" option.  When you have multiple changes on a form AND they are all for the same reason, click the Quick Entry link to shrink that list down to just a single entry explaining the changes for all the data points.